Trauma Release ~ Deep State Relaxation

by Lesley

For obvious reasons I don’t get a lot of testimonials for this – nobody really wants to admit to being traumatised, but the truth of the matter is this; we have ALL been traumatised by something, at some stage in our lives!

We could all be classed as damaged goods.

In an earlier post I covered, in part, my theory that the body holds that trauma until we learn to release it. I have no doubt that in some cases, illness is created from the mind (disease is different) as we dwell on certain instances or fearful events which have happened in our lives.  One of my teachers used to say that all illness comes from the mind; that what we focus on becomes a part of us. I believe this to be true.

I became interested in Holism at an early age but didn’t know it for what it was until I was in my thirties, when I went back to college to study Holistic Therapies. In each of my ‘past lives’ I’ve had subtle reminders that the path was always going to lead me to where I am now; with every area of my work being geared to healing something in the people taking part, including me as I learn another new thing, or a deeper level of compassion.

In workshops I promote the 3 R’s; Respect, Responsibility and Relaxation. Each are equally important on any personal journey.

There’s only one problem with that – people DO NOT want to tackle their responsibilities for fear of being faced with an unknown.  Some  people have no respect for themselves or others around them, yet they have normalised their own behaviour to include racism, homophobia, bullying or some other undesirable characteristic. To relax is completely unheard of; that would mean letting the guard down, exposing vulnerabilities and showing weakness.

In my experience, people who display these tendencies have also endured emotional hardship, some akin to starvation so have erected solid walls around themselves, then no-one can penetrate to the real person beneath.  Some would rather remain in denial.

The flip-side of this is the real  person is usually screaming to come out, but has no idea how to. What has become apparent to me is that there are a lot of people out there waiting and wanting someone else to do the hard work of change for them.

Here’s where guidance towards balance comes in handy; how do you know when you’re out of kilter?

Some have to go through another trauma to recognise it, such as a relationship breakdown, serious health issue or perhaps the death of someone close. Others take a different route, drinking or taking drugs to the point of dependency and are forced to make change in their lives, either that or look forward to an early grave.

There are complex reasons for reaching the place where you know you have to change. This is where the real growth begins; eyes can no longer remain wide shut.

Tackling the niggling negativity and the nagging self-doubt is an arduous process where many slip and slide off their wagon. Whether staying on that wagon means no drink/ drugs or giving up on old destructive patterns, waning confidence is a problem. It’s bloody difficult to feel confident when you’re filled with self-loathing!

Health problems may also make a sudden appearance or become chronic, adding to distress and feelings of powerlessness.

Deep-seated trauma, perhaps from childhood or from experiencing extreme hardships, like war, becomes firmly stuck in the body and/or mind. In that person’s mind it’s a case of having to do what’s necessary to protect them from further damage; it’s become a survival instinct – one which has served well in the past but may no longer positively serve in the present.

Sometimes there’s a display of behaviour from an affected person which can be fairly accurately pin-pointed to the age he or she was when the trauma occurred. For them, in that situation, time has stood still.The trauma has quite literally stunted their growth; usually with the immaturity of the age at which this event took place.

They’ve become stuck in the rut of old scenarios, unable to break cycles so continuing to do what saved their bacon then; throwing a pity-party, attempting to control every outcome – perhaps using manipulation or some other form of abuse, usually ending up back at square one where nothing has been resolved… and after a lull amidst a chorus of ‘sorrys’, will do almost exactly the same thing again.

Very few tackle a problem before it becomes a crisis so the cycle is perpetuated – until crisis forces that change.

Time is a great healer of many things but sometimes we need a little more of a helping hand. Over a period of time the pain may lessen but for those who’ve been exposed to trauma, it rarely goes away without some kind of intervention, like counseling or hypnotherapy. Wouldn’t it be great if we could just flick off the switch and re-boot the system?

Want to know a secret? We CAN! 

Training workshops do the trick for those who feel safe working through their issues in a group. Self exploration and analysis helps to identify negative beliefs. Each person will carry out their own introspective exercises and may choose to share some of their findings with others as they break through barriers which have held them back from achieving their goals. Whenever possible my group-work is held in a natural setting; away from the hustle and bustle of the city, in open country-side, sometimes using open-fires for cooking.

Deep State Relaxation ~ the treatment;

On an individual level a treatment (or course of treatments) may be just what’s needed; space and time to heal the body and mind. Using a combination of hands-on techniques (originating from the Japanese arts of Setai, Shotai and Shiatsu) with the added benefit of Reiki, the body goes into ‘idle’ mode as it rests and realigns itself, preparing for the next task.

Sometimes clients feel a little disoriented when they awaken from what may have been a 20 minute sound sleep because it feels like they’ve been out for hours. Usually they report a fantastic night’s sleep after only the first treatment.

One client, an  ex-army officer suffered from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) had been unable to have more than 3 hours sleep a night. He called me to say he’d slept for a full ten hours after the treatment – minus his horrific nightmares, and this was his first decent sleep in almost four years. Treatments lessened the frequency and intensity of his anxiety attacks and allowed him a more regular sleeping pattern. This in turn, enabled him to live a more ‘normal’ life.

Another client recently reported after his treatment that while he was completely aware of descending into his deep state of relaxation, he was also distinctly sensing a very strong vibe of care; something which I believe to be at the heart of all that I do. In conversation afterwards he explained that his back pain has reduced overnight by 75%.

DSR – Deep State Relaxation – induces feelings of relaxation – more often than not, sending the client into a deep sleep.

For those who are a little more adventurous in overcoming obstacles, a firewalk may be more in line with your style. Pushing yourself to your limit may be only truly interesting for those who recognise the inner challenge, the warriors among us who find no difficulty in going the extra mile.

If this is you then a weekend in Scotland may be enticing; one where you have the privilege of attending a sweatlodge AND complete the three-day transformational journey with a solo firewalk. This course in Self Mastery is not for the faint-hearted.

It matters not which of the above my clients choose, all are guaranteed to ‘change your chi’ (your emotional/ physical attitudes and responses to stress). Each and every one will pick what’s appropriate to them and their stage in the healing process.

Here’s a snap-shot of a firewalking workshop…

http://youtu.be/VGqwVC20WbE

About Lesley

Lesley Rodgers has written 146 posts on this blog.

Personal Development Consultant and Confidence Coach. Lesley is also a committed Human Rights Activist with her heart firmly lodged in 'community' and collaboration.

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